31 March, 2015

Orthodox Western Saints for Today


Pre-Schism Saints of the Orthodox Roman Patriarchate*
31st March (18th March O.S.)
:



Icon of Orthodox Saints of the British Isles


  • EDWARD THE MARTYR, the holy and right-believing King Edward the Martyr succeeded his father, St. Edgar the Peaceful (8th July), as King of England, but was murdered after a reign of only a few years. As the murder was attributed to “irreligious” opponents, and Edward himself was considered a good Christian, he was glorified as St. Edward the Martyr by an English Church Council (A.D. 1001), an act which has been confirmed by the Council of Bishops of the Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia (Decree Nº 255, dated 6/19 September, 1979). He may also be considered a passion-bearer.

    Icon of King Edward the Martyr

    TROPARION of ST. EDWARD THE MARTYR — TONE IV
    Celebrating the newly manifest commemoration of the holy King Edward,
    who shone forth of old in the virtues and suffered undeservedly we all
    bow down before the Icon of his honoured countenance and in gladness cry out:
    Truly Thou art wonderful in Thy Saints, O God.

  • St. Edward ascended to the throne at the age of thirteen. Though the eldest son of King St. Edgar the Peaceful, Edward’s accession to the throne was contested by a group headed by his stepmother, Queen Elfrida, who wished her son, Ethelred the Unready, to become king instead. However, Edward’s claim had more support—including that of St. Dunstan (19th May) — and was confirmed by the Witan.

    Described by Theodoric Paulus as “a young man of great devotion and excellent conduct; he was wholly Catholic, good and of holy life; moreover, above all things he loved God and the Church; he was generous to the poor, a haven to the good, a champion of the Faith of Christ, a vessel full of every virtuous grace”. St. Edward continued his father’s policies and support for St. Dunstan’s (19th May) reforms. This displeased those nobles who had designs on monastic lands, and they joined with Queen Elfrida in a conspiracy to do away with the young king. On 18th March A.D. 978 the king was murdered whilst sitting on his horse outside the home of his younger brother.

    Almost immediately following his martyrdom, miracles began. Following the murder, the body of the king slipped from the saddle of his horse and was dragged with one foot in the stirrup until the body fell into a stream (which was subsequently found to have healing properties — particularly for the blind) at the base of the hill upon which Corfe Castle stands. Queen Elfrida then ordered the body be hidden in a nearby hut. This hut was occupied by a woman who had been blind from birth, receiving the tenancy from the Queen as an act of charity. During the night the entire hut was filled with a most wondrous light, and, struck with awe, the woman cried out “Lord, have mercy!” and her sight was restored. The church of St. Edward at Corfe Castle, Dorset today marks the location where the hut is believed to have stood. When the Queen learned of this miracle, she ordered that the body be buried in a marsh near Wareham. However, a year later a pillar of fire was seen over the spot where the body was hidden. The locals raised the body, and, accompanied by a large group of mourners, translated the relics to a church in Wareham where they buried them in the east end of the church. The relics, which when exhumed were found to be still whole and incorrupt, were next translated to Shaftesbury Abbey where they were received by the nuns and buried with full royal honours on the north side of the altar.

    During the Dissolution of the Monasteries under Henry VIII, St. Edward’s relics were hidden so as to avoid desecration. In A.D. 1931, the relics were recovered by Mr. J.E. Wilson-Claridge during an archaeological excavation; their identity was confirmed by Dr. T.E.A. Stowell, an osteologist. These findings were confirmed by the Council of Bishops of the Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia (Decree Nº 255, dated 6/19 September, A.D. 1979). Mr. Wilson-Claridge donated the relics to the Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia, which placed them in the care of the monastery of the St. Edward Brotherhood at Brookwood Cemetery, in Woking, Surrey.
  • EGBERT, a monk at Ripon, St. Egbert reposed circa A.D. 720. No further information on this saint is extant.
  • FREDIANO (FRIGIDANUS, FRIGDIANUS), an Irishman who went on pilgrimage to Rome and settled as a hermit on Monte Pisano, and in A.D. 566 was consecrated Bishop of Lucca. He rebuilt the Cathedral after it had been burnt down by the Lombards, reposing in A.D. 588.
  • NARCISSUS AND FELIX, a bishop and his deacon venerated as martyrs in Gerona in Catalonia. Their martyrdom is dated circa A.D. 307.


* - Prior to the Schism the Patriarchate of Rome was Orthodox and fully in communion with the Orthodox Church. As Saint John of Shanghai and San Francisco +1966 said "The West was Orthodox for a thousand years, and her venerable Liturgy is far older than any of her heresies."



Orthodox Saints of the British Isles
Volume III

Orthodox Saints of the British Isles — Volume III — July - September

Available in paperback and for Kindle on amazon.com and amazon.co.uk


             Available for Nook


Orthodox Western Saints Database
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30 March, 2015

Orthodox Western Saints for Today


Pre-Schism Saints of the Orthodox Roman Patriarchate*
30th March (17th March O.S.)
:



Icon of Orthodox Saints of the British Isles


  • AGRICOLA (AGRELE, AREGLE), an ascetic who served as eighth Bishop of Châlon-sur-Saône in Burgundy. St. Agricola was know for his concern for the spirtual well-being of his flock and the orderly performance of services. St. Gregory of Tours (17th November) wrote of his asceticism. St. Agricola reposed in A.D. 580 at the age of eighty-three.
  • ALEXANDER AND THEODORE, (Date Uncertain), earlier hagiographers have left us extremely limited information on these two saints based upon manuscripts no longer extant. They seem to have been martyrs in Rome, and it is even possible that Alexander was a bishop and Theodore his deacon.
  • GERTRUDE OF NIVELLES, the daughter of Pepin of Landen and St. Ida (8th May). St. Ida founded the convent of Nivelles for herself and her daughter, but insisted that St. Gertrude be the first abbess. Though only twenty years of age, St. Gertrude accepted this obedience. At the age of thirty she resigned in favour of her niece Wilfetrudis. St. Gertrude reposed in A.D. 659.
  • PATRICK, our father among the Saints Patrick of Ireland, Bishop of Armagh and Enlightener of Ireland, was born a Briton. Captured and brought to Ireland as a slave, he escaped and returned home. Later he returned to Ireland, bringing Christianity to its people. Although St. Patrick achieved remarkable results in spreading the Gospel, he was not the first or only missionary in Ireland, but it was St. Patrick who had the greatest influence and success in preaching the Gospel of Christ. Therefore, he is known as “The Enlightener of Ireland”.

    Icon of St. Patrick of Ireland

    TROPARION of ST. PATRICK — TONE III
    Holy Bishop Patrick,
    Faithful shepherd of Christ’s royal flock,
    You filled Ireland with the radiance of the Gospel:
    The mighty strength of the Trinity!
    Now that you stand before the Saviour,
    Pray that He may preserve us in faith and love!

    KONTAKION of ST. PATRICK — TONE IV
    From slavery, you escaped to freedom in Christ’s service:
    He sent you to deliver Ireland from the devil’s bondage.
    You planted the Word of the Gospel in pagan hearts.
    In your journeys and hardships, you rivalled the Apostle Paul!
    Having received the reward for your labours in heaven,
    Never cease to pray for the flock you have gathered on earth,
    Holy Bishop Patrick!

  • Undoubtedly one of the best known of the Saints, his Lives and writings have been widely published in numerous languages and lands. St. Patrick was born in Britain, the son of a local decurio (member of a town council) called Calpornius who was also a deacon of the church, and who had a property near the village (vicu) of Bannavem Taburniae, the location of which is unknown. Patrick was brought up as a Christian, though in no tradition of strong piety. At the age of sixteen, he was captured by Irish pirates who took him back to Ireland where he spent six years as a herdsman. Whilst in captivity he experienced a religious conversion, and eventually received a Divine message that he was to escape. He then made his way to a port some 320 kilometres away where he found a ship whose crew he was able to convince to take him to Britain. At some point he later he went to Gaul and studied for the priesthood at Auxerre under St. Germanus (31st July). Eventually St. Patrick was consecrated bishop, and was entrusted with the mission to Ireland, succeeding St. Palladius (7th July), who had not had much success there. Though the conversion of the pagan Irish people was far from an easy task, St. Patrick persevered despite hostility, violence, and threats of death. However, in the end he baptised thousands people into Christ, founded many churches and encouraged the growth of monasticism throughout the land. By the time he established Armagh as his See, St. Patrick not only had many native priests and deacons to assist him, but other bishops as well.

    St. Patrick is often depicted holding a shamrock, or with snakes fleeing from him. He used the shamrock to illustrate the doctrine of the Holy Trinity; its three leaves growing out of a single stem helped him to explain the concept of one God in three Persons. It is commonly accepted that the story of St. Patrick driving all the snakes out of Ireland has no basis in fact.

    St. Patrick reposed on 17th March, though the exact year is a matter of some speculation, with dates ranging from A.D. 461 to A.D. 493. The various accounts of his last days are most likely legend, and it had been said that the place of his burial was unknown, though St. Columba of Iona (9th June) says the Holy Spirit revealed to him that St. Patrick was buried at the site of his first church in Saul, Co. Down, and a granite marker was placed at his traditional grave site in Downpatrick A.D. 1899.


* - Prior to the Schism the Patriarchate of Rome was Orthodox and fully in communion with the Orthodox Church. As Saint John of Shanghai and San Francisco +1966 said "The West was Orthodox for a thousand years, and her venerable Liturgy is far older than any of her heresies."



Orthodox Saints of the British Isles
Volume III

Orthodox Saints of the British Isles — Volume III — July - September

Available in paperback and for Kindle on amazon.com and amazon.co.uk


             Available for Nook


Orthodox Western Saints Database
Search by Name or Date









All books by Dr. Hutchison-Hall are available at the
iBookstore,   Google Play, and for Nook as well!





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29 March, 2015

Orthodox Western Saints for Today


Pre-Schism Saints of the Orthodox Roman Patriarchate*
29th March (16th March O.S.)
:



Icon of Orthodox Saints of the British Isles


  • ABBAN, (Fifth Century), a nephew of St. Ibar (23rd April), and contemporary of St. Patrick (17th March), St. Abban founded Kill-Abban Abbey in Leinster. No further information on this saint is extant.
  • AGAPITUS, (Third or Fourth Century), the eleventh Bishop of Ravenna.
  • ALEXANDER I, (3rd May on Western calendars), the fifth Pope of Rome from circa A.D. 107 until his repose circa A.D. 115.
  • DENTLIN (DENTELIN, DENAIN), (Seventh Century), the son of St. Vincent Madelgarus (20th September) and St. Waldetrudis (9th April), and brother of SS. Landry (17th April), Adeltrudis (25th February), and Madalberta (7th September). Though only seven years old when he reposed, he has always been venerated as a saint with the rest of his family.
  • EUSEBIA, the eldest daughter of SS. Adalbald (2nd February) and Rictrudis (12th May). She received monastic tonsure at Hamay-les-Marchiennes near Arras, a convent which had been founded by her grandmother St. Gertrude the Elder (6th December), whom she succeeded as abbess. St. Eusebia reposed circa A.D. 680.
  • FINIAN, a disciple of St. Columba of Iona (9th June), he is said to have been Abbot of Swords just north of Dublin. However, as is the case with many of his contemporaries, ascertaining the truth within the various and tangled traditions of his Life is impossible.


  • Icon of St. Gregory Makar

  • GREGORY MAKAR, an Armenian monk who was elected Bishop of Nicopolis in Armenia. Forced to flee to France, he settled as a hermit in Pithiviers near Orleans, reposing circa A.D. 1000. St. Gregory Makar is credited with introducing gingerbread to Europe.
  • HERIBERT, a native of Worms, and a monk at Gorze, who became Archbishop of Cologne. An outstanding churchman, learned, zealous and enterprising, he built the monastery of Deutz on the Rhine, where he was buried, after his repose in A.D. 1022.
  • HILARY, TATIAN, FELIX, LARGUS AND DENIS, Hilary was Bishop of Aquileia, Tatian his deacon, and the others laymen. They were beheaded under Numerian circa A.D. 284.
  • MEGINGAUD (MENGOLD, MEGINGOZ), a monk and eventually Abbot at Fritzlar in present-day Hesse in Germany. He succeeded St. Burchard (14th October) as Bishop of Würzburg circa A.D. 754, reposing in A.D. 794.


* - Prior to the Schism the Patriarchate of Rome was Orthodox and fully in communion with the Orthodox Church. As Saint John of Shanghai and San Francisco +1966 said "The West was Orthodox for a thousand years, and her venerable Liturgy is far older than any of her heresies."



Orthodox Saints of the British Isles
Volume III

Orthodox Saints of the British Isles — Volume III — July - September

Available in paperback and for Kindle on amazon.com and amazon.co.uk


             Available for Nook


Orthodox Western Saints Database
Search by Name or Date









All books by Dr. Hutchison-Hall are available at the
iBookstore,   Google Play, and for Nook as well!





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28 March, 2015

Orthodox Western Saints for Today


Pre-Schism Saints of the Orthodox Roman Patriarchate*
28th March (15th March O.S.)
:



Icon of Orthodox Saints of the British Isles


  • ARISTOBULUS, (also 4th January and 31st October), (First Century), the Holy Apostle Aristobulus of the Seventy, Bishop of Britain is traditionally numbered as one of the Seventy, and is the Aristobulus mentioned by St. Paul in his epistle to the Romans (Romans 16:10). After being consecrated bishop by St. Paul he was sent to Britain where he worked to enlighten the pagan population and ultimately met his martyrdom.

  • Icon of St. Aristobulus


  • LEOCRITIA (LUCRETIA), a holy virgin in Cordoba. Though raised as a Muslim, she converted to Orthodoxy and had to flee from her home, and was sheltered by St. Eulogius (11th March). Both were flogged and beheaded in A.D. 859.
  • MANCIUS, (Fifth or Sixth Century), a native of Rome who was bought as a slave by Jewish traders who then took him to Evora in Portugal where he was martyred by his masters.
  • PROBUS, a Bishop of Rieti in Latium, who reposed circa A.D. 571.
  • SPECIOSUS, a wealthy landowner from Campania who became a monk at Monte Cassino with his brother Gregory. He was the founder of the monastery at Terracina but reposed in Capua circa A.D. 555. St. Gregory the Dialogist (3rd September) wrote of his holy life.
  • ZACHARIAS, Pope of Rome from A.D. 741 until his repose in A.D. 752, he was born in San Severino in Calabria of a Greek family. St. Zacharias was very zealous in the restoration of the churches of Rome to which he made costly gifts. He also restored the Lateran palace, and translated to the Church of St. George in Velabro the head of the martyr St. George which was found during the repairs of the decayed Lateran Palace, and made a translation of the Dialogues of St. Gregory the Dialogist (3rd September) into Greek, which was largely circulated in the East.


* - Prior to the Schism the Patriarchate of Rome was Orthodox and fully in communion with the Orthodox Church. As Saint John of Shanghai and San Francisco +1966 said "The West was Orthodox for a thousand years, and her venerable Liturgy is far older than any of her heresies."



Orthodox Saints of the British Isles
Volume III

Orthodox Saints of the British Isles — Volume III — July - September

Available in paperback and for Kindle on amazon.com and amazon.co.uk


             Available for Nook


Orthodox Western Saints Database
Search by Name or Date









All books by Dr. Hutchison-Hall are available at the
iBookstore,   Google Play, and for Nook as well!





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27 March, 2015

Orthodox Western Saints for Today


Pre-Schism Saints of the Orthodox Roman Patriarchate*
27th March (14th March O.S.)
:



Icon of Orthodox Saints of the British Isles


  • BENEDICT, (11th July on Western calendars), born near Nursia in Umbria, at the age of twenty he went to live as a hermit in a cave near Subiaco. In time many disciples flocked to him and he built a lavra, composed of twelve small monasteries for them. Around A.D. 530 he left Subiaco for Monte Cassino, where he founded a monastery, and spent the rest of his life as a deacon and famed as a wonderworker. St. Benedict reposed while standing in prayer before the altar A.D. 550; some of his relics were later translated to France but others remained at Monte Cassino.
    Icon of St. Benedict of Nursia

  • BONIFACE CURITAN, a Bishop of Ross in Scotland, who was very likely the leader of a group of missionaries sent from Rome to evangelise the Picts and Scots. St. Boniface Curitan is said to have founded one hundred and fifty churches. He reposed circa A.D. 650.
  • DIACONUS, (Sixth Century), a deacon in the Marsi in present-day central Italy, whose name is lost to time. He was martyred together with two monks by the Lombards.
  • LEO, (Fourth or Fifth Century), a bishop of whom nothing is now known to us. It seems he was martyred under the Arians, in the Agro Verano.
  • MATILDA (MATHILDIS, MAUD), the wife of the German Emperor, Henry the Fowler. A very generous and charitable woman, St. Matilda founded the monasteries of Nordhausen, Pöhlde, Engern and Quedlinburg, but to list a few. She was a widow for thirty years and abused by her sons, who stole most of her possessions. St. Matilda reposed in A.D. 968
  • PETER AND APHRODISIUS, (Fifth Century), martyrs under the Arian Vandals in North Africa.
  • MARTYRS OF ROME, forty-seven martyrs who are traditionally believed to have been baptised by the Apostle Peter, and are said to have suffered in Rome under Nero, all on the same day circa A.D. 67.
  • MARTYRS OF VALERIA, (Fifth Century), two monks in the province of Valeria in present-day Italy who were slain by the Lombards by being hanged on a tree. Even after they were dead, they were heard singing psalms even by their enemies.
  • TALMACH, little is known of this saint aside from a few references to him by the Bollandists, Colgan, and an old Life of St. Finnbarr of Cork (25th September). He seems to have been a disciple of St. Barr (25th September) at Lough Erc (present–day Guagán Barra, Co. Cork), and later founder of a monastery.


* - Prior to the Schism the Patriarchate of Rome was Orthodox and fully in communion with the Orthodox Church. As Saint John of Shanghai and San Francisco +1966 said "The West was Orthodox for a thousand years, and her venerable Liturgy is far older than any of her heresies."



Orthodox Saints of the British Isles
Volume III

Orthodox Saints of the British Isles — Volume III — July - September

Available in paperback and for Kindle on amazon.com and amazon.co.uk


             Available for Nook


Orthodox Western Saints Database
Search by Name or Date









All books by Dr. Hutchison-Hall are available at the
iBookstore,   Google Play, and for Nook as well!





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26 March, 2015

Orthodox Western Saints for Today


Pre-Schism Saints of the Orthodox Roman Patriarchate*
26th March (13th March O.S.)
:



Icon of Orthodox Saints of the British Isles


  • ANSOVINUS, a native of Camerino in the Marches, who, after living as a hermit at Castel Raimondo near Torcello, became bishop of his native town. His acceptance of the office was conditioned upon his See being exempt from the service of recruiting soldiers, then imposed on most bishops. He reposed in A.D. 840.
  • GERALD, St. Gerald founded the monastery, and Diocese of Mayo in western Ireland. He was one of the English monks who accompanied St. Colman (18th February) when he retired to Ireland, following the Synod of Whitby. St. Colman made him abbot of the English monastery he founded at Mayo, which he ruled with great success, reposing at a very advanced age A.D. 732.
  • HELDRAD (ELDRAD), originally from Provence, he spent his fortune on good works, and then went on a pilgrimage to Rome, where he became a monk at the monastery of Novalese. St. Heldrad served as Abbot of Novalese for thirty years, reposing in A.D. 842.
  • KEVOCA (KENNOTHA, QUIVOCA), an Irish or Scottish saint of whom nothing is now known with any certitude. Some claim that he is the same saint as St. Mochoemoc (vide infra), founder and first Abbot of Liath-Mochoemoc in Tipperary. However, in ancient Scottish Calendars St. Kevoca is listed as a female saint.
  • MOCHOEMOC (MOCHAEMHOG, PULCHERIUS, VULCANIUS), the nephew of St. Ita (15th January), he became a monk at Bangor under St. Comgall (10th May), and later founded Liath-Mochoemoc. St. Mochoemoc reposed circa A.D. 655.
  • RAMIRUS AND COMPANIONS, a group of monks at the monastery of St. Claudio in León in Hispania who were martyred by the Arian Visigoths while they sang the Creed, circa A.D. 554 or A.D. 630.
  • RUDERICUS (RODERICK, RODRIGO) AND SALOMON (SOLOMON), Roderick was a priest in Cabra near Cordoba, who was imprisoned for apostasy under Sharia law, after being betrayed by his Muslim brother. Whilst in prison he shared a cell with his fellow-martyr, Salomon a layman. They were both martyred in Cordoba in A.D. 857. St. Eulogius (11th March), a contemporary, recorded some of the details of their trial, tortures and death, which are still extant.


* - Prior to the Schism the Patriarchate of Rome was Orthodox and fully in communion with the Orthodox Church. As Saint John of Shanghai and San Francisco +1966 said "The West was Orthodox for a thousand years, and her venerable Liturgy is far older than any of her heresies."



Orthodox Saints of the British Isles
Volume III

Orthodox Saints of the British Isles — Volume III — July - September

Available in paperback and for Kindle on amazon.com and amazon.co.uk


             Available for Nook


Orthodox Western Saints Database
Search by Name or Date









All books by Dr. Hutchison-Hall are available at the
iBookstore,   Google Play, and for Nook as well!





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25 March, 2015

Orthodox Western Saints for Today


Pre-Schism Saints of the Orthodox Roman Patriarchate*
25th March (12th March O.S.)
:



Icon of Orthodox Saints of the British Isles


  • ALPHEGE THE ELDER, he was called the Elder to distinguish him from his more famous namesake, the Martyr of Canterbury and Greenwich (19th April). He was a monk of singularly holy life, and encouraged many others to become monks, notably his relative St. Dunstan (19th May), whom he ordained priest. St. Alphege succeeded St. Birnstan (4th November) in the See of Winchester (A.D. 935), where he reposed; his relics were enshrined there (A.D. 951).
  • MAMILIAN (MAXIMILIAN), (Date Unknown), a martyr in Rome.
  • MAXIMILIAN, a young man who refused to do military service, and was subsequently martyred in A.D. 295 at Thebeste in Numidia (present-day Algeria).
  • MURA MCFEREDACH (MURAN, MURAMES), St. Mura McFeredach was the first Abbot and patron saint of Fahan, on the Inishowen Peninsula, in Co. Donegal. His staff and bell were held to have miraculous powers, and were greatly venerated. The year of his death in the seventh century A.D. is unknown.
  • PAUL AURELIAN, born in Wales, he received monastic tonsure with SS. Illtyd (6th November), David (1st March), Samson (28th July), and Gildas the Wise (29th January). After living on Caldey Island for a while, St. Paul went to Brittany where he established a monastery at Porz-Pol on the Isle of Ouessant, and then went to Ouismor (now Saint-Pol-de-Léon) where he became bishop, reposing circa A.D. 575.
  • PETER THE DEACON, disciple, secretary and companion of St. Gregory the Dialogist (3rd September). He reposed circa A.D. 605, and is venerated as the patron-saint of Salussola in Italy.


* - Prior to the Schism the Patriarchate of Rome was Orthodox and fully in communion with the Orthodox Church. As Saint John of Shanghai and San Francisco +1966 said "The West was Orthodox for a thousand years, and her venerable Liturgy is far older than any of her heresies."



Orthodox Saints of the British Isles
Volume III

Orthodox Saints of the British Isles — Volume III — July - September

Available in paperback and for Kindle on amazon.com and amazon.co.uk


             Available for Nook


Orthodox Western Saints Database
Search by Name or Date









All books by Dr. Hutchison-Hall are available at the
iBookstore,   Google Play, and for Nook as well!





Looking for Orthodox Books, CDs, or DVDs?